Link/The APIASF AANAPISI Scholarship Application closes in three weeks!

To help you in the home stretch, here are some tips and steps you can take to complete your application. 

  • Select & Notify Your Recommender If you haven’t done so yet, select who you would like to write your Letter of Recommendation and notify them. Simply click Tab 10 in the online application and type in your recommender’s information. Follow-up with a phone call, text, or email to make sure they received notice and remind them of the deadline. Remember if they don’t submit their letter by the application, your application is considered incomplete. 

    Recommendation Tip Sheet: http://www.apiasf.org/pdfs/Recommendation_Tip_Sheet.pdf
  • Plan for Your Essays Review the essay questions and start making outlines. Be sure to answer all parts of the questions. Don’t be afraid to be yourself and write about what you are truly passionate about. Quality over quantity, a longer essay does not mean a better essay.

APIASF AANAPISI SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION DEADLINE: October 15, 2014 at 9:00 PM EDT 
COMPLETE YOUR APPLICATION: 
https://aanapisischolarship.apiasf.org

Don’t forget that a complete application includes the following:

  1. Completed Online Application
  2. Submitted Letter of Recommendation
  3. FAFSA Student Aid Report (FAFSA) 

For questions, contact aanapisischolarship@apiasf.org or 877.808.7032 ext. 108

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar
Because of my Posse, I was able to see major issues happening in my community. Attending a private, white institution, some of my friends did not feel safe here because of how the community was treating them. They did not let it get to them and one of my Posse members, Emerald Rutledge, started a campaign called, #ITOOAMWOO. #ITOOAMWOO is a movement to provide a voice for all black students on the campus. It widens my scope because it shows me that we, a minority, have to stick together to achieve the same goal: for everyone to be treated with kindness.

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar

Because of my Posse, I was able to see major issues happening in my community. Attending a private, white institution, some of my friends did not feel safe here because of how the community was treating them. They did not let it get to them and one of my Posse members, Emerald Rutledge, started a campaign called, #ITOOAMWOO. #ITOOAMWOO is a movement to provide a voice for all black students on the campus. It widens my scope because it shows me that we, a minority, have to stick together to achieve the same goal: for everyone to be treated with kindness.

widen your scope

Grace Lee Boggs once said:

Our challenge… is to deepen the commonalities and the bonds between these tens of millions, while at the same time continuing to address the issues within our local communities by two-sided struggles that not only say “No” to the existing power structure but also empower our constituencies to embrace the power within each of us to crease the world anew.

Have you taken a look at what is happening in your community and discovered that these issues are occurring in different communities around the world? How are you widening your scope?

By Betty Tran, APIASF Scholar
Engaging in community service work in USC’s local community proved to me that USC truly belongs to South Central Los Angeles. Although USC has a well-resourced private school environment, our neighbors have many gaps to fill in order to provide their children with a quality education. To the local community, USC is known as the University of Service to the Community, and has established a range of educational programs such as the Neighborhood Academic Initiative (NAI), Joint Educational Project (JEP), and USC Readers to engage academically with the local students. These programs provide a unique opportunity for USC students to strengthen the intellectual interests of the local youth as well as their own, and offer high-quality academic support that these students may not be able to seek elsewhere. The University Park neighborhood, north of USC’s campus, has many working class immigrant families, often times with limited educational backgrounds and English abilities. I fell in love with the students I engaged with through working with children through USC’s Joint Educational Program. I realized that the students gave me a place in their community, and in turn I earned a sense of belonging to this community. In exchange, I shared my time and knowledge with them, and we created such beautiful interdependent relationships, which are at the root of thriving communities. I really hope each college student can find his or her local community to be just as rich with hope, culture, opportunity, friendships, and service as I have, by reaching my hand out to those around me.

By Betty Tran, APIASF Scholar

Engaging in community service work in USC’s local community proved to me that USC truly belongs to South Central Los Angeles. Although USC has a well-resourced private school environment, our neighbors have many gaps to fill in order to provide their children with a quality education. To the local community, USC is known as the University of Service to the Community, and has established a range of educational programs such as the Neighborhood Academic Initiative (NAI), Joint Educational Project (JEP), and USC Readers to engage academically with the local students. These programs provide a unique opportunity for USC students to strengthen the intellectual interests of the local youth as well as their own, and offer high-quality academic support that these students may not be able to seek elsewhere. The University Park neighborhood, north of USC’s campus, has many working class immigrant families, often times with limited educational backgrounds and English abilities. I fell in love with the students I engaged with through working with children through USC’s Joint Educational Program. I realized that the students gave me a place in their community, and in turn I earned a sense of belonging to this community. In exchange, I shared my time and knowledge with them, and we created such beautiful interdependent relationships, which are at the root of thriving communities. I really hope each college student can find his or her local community to be just as rich with hope, culture, opportunity, friendships, and service as I have, by reaching my hand out to those around me.

Fight Against Cancer - Public Awareness and Research as a Synergistic Approach - Shanawaj (Roy) Khair

By Shanawaj (Roy) Khair, APIASF/GMS Scholar

When my dear friend told me that she had lost her mother to breast cancer, I felt pretty removed from my surroundings at that moment-a cancer prevention lab in Stony Brook Medicine. There I was sitting on a chair, reading a scientific paper at my desk, and hoping to make my contribution to cancer prevention, but I couldn’t be there for my friend to support her and be a resource to her. After reflecting upon it, I realized that if I really wanted to make impact in people’s lives, I need to be more socially aware of the fight against cancer. I realized that cancer prevention needs research just as much as public awareness. If I made myself visible to the people around me, I could have been there for my friend when she needed my emotional support. That’s why I joined the fight against cancer. With the American Cancer Society (ACS) and Gates Millennium Scholars (GMS), we want to make a public stand to fight against cancer through research and public awareness. 

One of the activities I am looking forward to in this event is lobbying day. I have learned a good amount of how the research side of cancer prevention work through my work at cancer prevention lab in Stony Brook Medicine. I am very eager to learn about the decision making processes that law makers uses to fight against cancer. I am very excited to lobby for “Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2014.” I wish to communicate and translate the findings in lab to the public audience and the lawmakers, as I lobby for this bill because news of progress from the research world will be instrumental to find supporters for this battle against cancer. I will talk more about the bills specifically in my next blog post and as well as what I do in the lab to more contextualize myself in this fight. 

 

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar
Wooster is a small town in Northeast Ohio. I did not see much of what this town had to offer until I volunteered at The Wayne County Humane Society and Wooster Hope Center. Volunteering there, I was able to take care of animals that have been abused and also package food for people who need it. After spending my time there, I understood the importance of this town. This town is all about caring for one another and working together to create a unity in the community.

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar

Wooster is a small town in Northeast Ohio. I did not see much of what this town had to offer until I volunteered at The Wayne County Humane Society and Wooster Hope Center. Volunteering there, I was able to take care of animals that have been abused and also package food for people who need it. After spending my time there, I understood the importance of this town. This town is all about caring for one another and working together to create a unity in the community.

volunteer at a local community organization

How familiar are you with the local community where your campus or workplace is located? Volunteering can be a great way to learn about the resources and assets available in your community. How has volunteering at a local organization strengthened your understanding of a particular place?

Give Yourself Some Experience! A How-to on Finding and Interviewing for Lab Positions

By Tracy Ly, APIASF Scholar

Some of you may be in college or starting college and are interested in going to professional school after your undergraduate years. A great way to make yourself competitive and expose yourself to innovative research that applies the concepts you learn in college is through undergraduate research. This idea may seem a little far-fetched so let’s go through the steps on how to get a position!

    1. Research Your Interests 
      This isn’t the most profound idea that’s ever been presented, but some people don’t realize how important it is to thoroughly research. At most universities, there are a plethora of research opportunities that are available for students but not every opportunity is created equal. So research your interests, read a few professional articles, and go through your university research database to find out what is available for you.
    2. Make a Lab Resume and a Professional Cover Letter 
      Many students usually create a resume/curriculum vitae and cover letter during high school but don’t really keep up with it. It’s time to dust off the cobwebs and start working on them. Include your college achievements, job, volunteer work, and prior experience that you think may help you get this position. APIASF has great resources for students who are interested in making a professional resume and cover letter so take advantage of this service! 
    3. Email Professors and Principal Investigators (PI) 
      Once you find a professor/ PI that is doing research that you might be interested in, make sure you email them a copy of your resume, a cover letter, and a fantastic description of why you are interested in their research and how you can help them. It’s all about how you can advance their research!! 
    4. Waiting Game 
      Once you’ve done all these steps, you just have to wait it out. During this time, continue to research on what your lab focuses on and their primary goals. 
    5. INTERVIEW TIME? 
      Fortunately, by now you’ve received a few invitations to interview with a lab. Congratulations! If not, repeat the process until you do. To prepare for the interview, make sure you know what you want to gain from the experience, why you’re interested in their research and what you can contribute to the lab. Be friendly and approachable as well. No one wants to work with someone who doesn’t have a great attitude.  Make sure you print out your cover letter and resume for your interviewer to show that you are well prepared. Other than that, dress for success and just relax!
    6. During the Interview 
      Understand that the interview is not strictly for the lab to get facts about you. It is also a fantastic experience for the interviewee to gain some insight on the position, the work you will be doing, and whom you will be working with. Don’t simply take a position because you think it will look good on a resume. This attitude doesn’t travel very far in the professional world. If you’re thoroughly interested in the research, you will gain so much more from this experience.

Undergraduate research is a great way to expose yourself to new concepts within your field of interest. Don’t be discouraged if you need to go through multiple interviews to get the position you want. The process of finding a lab position is similar to finding a job in the real world so it will take some time. Keep your head up and happy hunting!

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar
Before I act, I take a step back and think about the goals and purposes of what I stand behind. Then, I research the cause of what I believe in and make sure I agree to a certain extent the overall message that it is trying to portray. Every decision I make reflects who I am as a person and also can impact the generations after me.
As far as the picture, this is me and my little sister, Amanda. Amanda has been a major influence in my life. She saw me go through a rebellious phase during my high school yearz, and she was my main reason for why I stopped what I was doing and transformed into the big sister she expected me to be. In this picture, she was officially initiated into the Junior Beta Club, and received the position of officer. When she was delivering her speech, I realized that she has so much drive at such a young age and I couldn’t wait to see her grow up. By being a role model to her, she is excelling in academics and extracurricular activities as well as having a positive influence in her community. I couldn’t be more proud of Amanda. 

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar

Before I act, I take a step back and think about the goals and purposes of what I stand behind. Then, I research the cause of what I believe in and make sure I agree to a certain extent the overall message that it is trying to portray. Every decision I make reflects who I am as a person and also can impact the generations after me.

As far as the picture, this is me and my little sister, Amanda. Amanda has been a major influence in my life. She saw me go through a rebellious phase during my high school yearz, and she was my main reason for why I stopped what I was doing and transformed into the big sister she expected me to be. In this picture, she was officially initiated into the Junior Beta Club, and received the position of officer. When she was delivering her speech, I realized that she has so much drive at such a young age and I couldn’t wait to see her grow up. By being a role model to her, she is excelling in academics and extracurricular activities as well as having a positive influence in her community. I couldn’t be more proud of Amanda. 

This week, APIASF is in Charlotte, North Carolina! Joy Yoo, our Senior Manager for Outreach & Community Relations, will be presenting in several locations around Charlotte to talk about our college scholarship programs. If you’re in the area and would like to attend a presentation, please email Joy ASAP at outreach@apiasf.org!
Monday, September 15 East Mecklenburg High SchoolCharlotte, NC
Tuesday, September 16 Garinger High School Charlotte, NC
Wednesday, September 17Independence High School Charlotte, NC

This week, APIASF is in Charlotte, North Carolina! Joy Yoo, our Senior Manager for Outreach & Community Relations, will be presenting in several locations around Charlotte to talk about our college scholarship programs. If you’re in the area and would like to attend a presentation, please email Joy ASAP at outreach@apiasf.org!

  • Monday, September 15 
    East Mecklenburg High School

    Charlotte, NC
  • Tuesday, September 16 
    Garinger High School 

    Charlotte, NC
  • Wednesday, September 17
    Independence High School 

    Charlotte, NC
re/present blogger and May 2014 /present Voice Shanawaj (Roy) Khair was recently selected to be a part of the GMS/ACS Cancer Action Network Delegation Team! Roy, and his fellow Scholars, will meet with members of Congress to discuss making cancer resources and research a top national priority.
For more information on the Gates Millennium Scholars Alumni Association’s partnership with the American Cancer Society, and how other Gates Scholars can get involved visit: gmsacsadvocacy.

re/present blogger and May 2014 /present Voice Shanawaj (Roy) Khair was recently selected to be a part of the GMS/ACS Cancer Action Network Delegation Team! Roy, and his fellow Scholars, will meet with members of Congress to discuss making cancer resources and research a top national priority.

For more information on the Gates Millennium Scholars Alumni Association’s partnership with the American Cancer Society, and how other Gates Scholars can get involved visit: gmsacsadvocacy.

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar
On 9/11 each year, we have discussions in class about this day. It is a touchy subject but we all feel we have a safe space and are able to have open discussions about it. We’ve dialogued about how this day shaped George W. Bush’s presidency or how it drastically changed a country’s perspective on religion. This day motivates me to take advantage of every day as if it was my last and to be open minded about everything.
 

By Brenda Khor, APIASF/GMS Scholar

On 9/11 each year, we have discussions in class about this day. It is a touchy subject but we all feel we have a safe space and are able to have open discussions about it. We’ve dialogued about how this day shaped George W. Bush’s presidency or how it drastically changed a country’s perspective on religion. This day motivates me to take advantage of every day as if it was my last and to be open minded about everything.