Here’s an oldie but a goodie — an Asian Pacific American Heritage Month PSA by poet Beau Sia from 2007.

Thank you to everyone who made this Possible. The Japanese American National Museum (www.janm.org), Leadership Education for Asian Pacifics (www.leap.org), AZN TV, XLOR Productions, and Signature Entertainment. Written and Performed by Beau Sia.

Establishing APAHM into Perpetuity

By The Honorable Ruby G. Moy, President and CEO, Asian American & Pacific Islander Association of Colleges and Universities (APIACU)

In the beginning there was a non-Asian Republican Congressman from Rochester, New York, who was interested in furthering the good deeds of the Asian community. His name was Frank Horton. I had just started working for the Congressman, who was also a Ranking Minority Member of the Committee on Government Operations and on the Committee on Postal Services, which had oversight on all proclamations and special recognition of days among a list of other priorities.

It was in the late seventies when we started to research the best time of the year to recognize the contributions of the Asian community. In my research, I found that on May 7, the first Japanese immigrants arrived in the United States, and on May 10, the last spike was pounded into the ground for the Transcontinental Railroad, which was the work of the Chinese who laid those tracks.

The recognition started out as a week’s observance. We didn’t think at the time to ask for a month because our office had seen that there were just too many observances for many things such as Pickle Day, Hot Dog Day, and Ms. Watermelon. We felt our recognition of a community that was far-reaching and more meaningful would bring credence and honor to a hard-working class of people that would not have been recognized otherwise.

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may 01/ what being AANHPI means to me

By April D. Rongero, APIASF Staff

It’s cliche, but I was actually on the receiving end of those playground “ching chang chong” taunts. I can still recall the panic, frustration, and anger that welled up in my chest as I shouted back, “I’m not even Chinese!”

Being Asian American — and Filipino American, Texan, and a woman — is complicated. It means I’ve been attempting to understand my identities since my youth. It means I’ve sometimes wondered whether I was too Asian or too American, or not enough of either, and if any of that really means anything at all. It means searching for faces that look like mine on TV, in magazines, and in the movies, but coming up short.

But, it also means having a community with which I can celebrate successes and lament failures, and it means having a rich history that I can only continue to learn from. It means feeling a sense of comfort when I hear someone speaking Tagalog or some other Filipino dialect, even though I don’t understand a word of it. It means pride and hope, and an unconditional love for SPAM. Being Asian American means all this (and then some) to me…

What does being AANHPI mean to you?

May is here, and this year, the re/present team has a lot to celebrate. Not only is it Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPIHM), but it’s also our 1-year blog anniversary and APIASF’s 10-year anniversary! Wow!
To celebrate in style, we put together a 31-day challenge for the month. We know that not all of the topics lend themselves (easily) to photographs, so this isn’t just a photo-a-day challenge, it’s daily photo and/or writing challenge!
re/present was created not just as a space for APIASF and APIASF/GMS Scholars to express themselves and connect with one another, but also as a way for the AANHPI voice to be present and at the table. Consider this your invitation to represent and be present during this meaningful month! We hope you join in on the month’s celebrations and look forward to seeing the many ways in which you #repAAPIHM!
Here are the daily topics for May:
May 1/ what being AANHPI means to me
May 2/ AANHPI role model
May 3/ influential AANHPI individual/leader
May 4/ successful AANHPI business owner
May 5/ AANHPI blogger or YouTube personality
May 6/ favorite AANHPI entertainer
May 7/ favorite AANHPI athlete
May 8/ family
May 9/ milestone for the AANHPI community
May 10/ your personal contribution to the community
May 11/ AANHPI issue/cause that is important to you
May 12/ influential AANHPI organization
May 13/ favorite dish inspired by AANHPI culture
May 14/ favorite AANHPI artist
May 15/ favorite work by an AANHPI author
May 16/ meaningful quote from an AANHPI
May 17/ little known fact about AANHPI history
May 18/ culture/tradition
May 19/ AANAPISI
May 20/ values
May 21/ celebrating diversity
May 22/ AANHPI stereotypes/misconceptions
May 23/ facing obstacles
May 24/ unity with other groups
May 25/ civil rights
May 26/ visibility
May 27/ inclusion
May 28/ justice
May 29/ legacy
May 30/ favorite thing about AAPIHM
May 31/ the future of AANHPIs

May is here, and this year, the re/present team has a lot to celebrate. Not only is it Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPIHM), but it’s also our 1-year blog anniversary and APIASF’s 10-year anniversary! Wow!

To celebrate in style, we put together a 31-day challenge for the month. We know that not all of the topics lend themselves (easily) to photographs, so this isn’t just a photo-a-day challenge, it’s daily photo and/or writing challenge!

re/present was created not just as a space for APIASF and APIASF/GMS Scholars to express themselves and connect with one another, but also as a way for the AANHPI voice to be present and at the table. Consider this your invitation to represent and be present during this meaningful month! We hope you join in on the month’s celebrations and look forward to seeing the many ways in which you #repAAPIHM!

Here are the daily topics for May:

  • May 1/ what being AANHPI means to me
  • May 2/ AANHPI role model
  • May 3/ influential AANHPI individual/leader
  • May 4/ successful AANHPI business owner
  • May 5/ AANHPI blogger or YouTube personality
  • May 6/ favorite AANHPI entertainer
  • May 7/ favorite AANHPI athlete
  • May 8/ family
  • May 9/ milestone for the AANHPI community
  • May 10/ your personal contribution to the community
  • May 11/ AANHPI issue/cause that is important to you
  • May 12/ influential AANHPI organization
  • May 13/ favorite dish inspired by AANHPI culture
  • May 14/ favorite AANHPI artist
  • May 15/ favorite work by an AANHPI author
  • May 16/ meaningful quote from an AANHPI
  • May 17/ little known fact about AANHPI history
  • May 18/ culture/tradition
  • May 19/ AANAPISI
  • May 20/ values
  • May 21/ celebrating diversity
  • May 22/ AANHPI stereotypes/misconceptions
  • May 23/ facing obstacles
  • May 24/ unity with other groups
  • May 25/ civil rights
  • May 26/ visibility
  • May 27/ inclusion
  • May 28/ justice
  • May 29/ legacy
  • May 30/ favorite thing about AAPIHM
  • May 31/ the future of AANHPIs

Welcoming the Honorable Ruby G. Moy to re/present!

The Honorable Ruby G. MoyBy now, most people know that May is Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month (AAPIHM), but many people don’t know how this historical and important event came to be.

To kick off AAPIHM 2013, we are thrilled to announce that we will be publishing a piece written by the Honorable Ruby G. Moy, a key figure in getting AAPIHM off the ground. Check back with us tomorrow — May 1, 2013 — to read Ms. Moy’s historical testimony on the origins of AAPIHM!

The Honorable Ruby G. Moy was appointed by the President in 1997 as Director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Until early 2001, Ms. Moy was in charge of the day-to-day operations of the $8.9 million Commission. Ms. Moy served from 1993 to 1997 as the Executive Assistant to the Director of the White House Office of Public Liaison.

In this capacity, Ms. Moy was involved in constituency outreach programs and official White House events. She also served as Chief of Staff to senior Congressman Frank Horton (R-NY) from 1973 to 1992. She was responsible for managing his Washington and district offices, overseeing a budget of $1 million, representing the Congressman in meetings with key Hill members, advising on policy programs, developing legislation, and serving as liaison to members, staff, committees, and constituents. Congressman Horton was the primary sponsor of two bills recognizing the Asian community. Ms. Moy helped spearhead the legislation to first designate the first 10 days in May as Asian Pacific Heritage Week and subsequently spearheaded the legislation to designate the entire month of May as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.

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From #repConnections to #repAAPIHM!

We hope you’ve enjoyed considering #whereistand and all the different ways that we can #repConnections. It is truly amazing to take a step back and see how we are connected to everything, everyone, and every place. We hope that this month leaves you inspired to recognize all that you are connected to, and motivated to maintain those connections.

Speaking of connections, it was SO exciting to see some of you get to know one another via the #repConnections interview project this month. (We hope the project was the start of a wonderful friendship for all of you!) re/present would be nothing without our incredible blog team; your reflections shape this blog into what it was intended to be — a space for and by you, our Scholars.

Of course, we’d also like to extend our gratitude to Mina Martinez for answering all of your questions about networking and career building.

May starts tomorrow, and all month long we will be celebrating many things, including the 1-year anniversary of re/present! (Aww!) Here’s a peek at our 31-day challenge for May. So bust out your cameras and thinking caps — it’s time to party!

image

The Origin of APAHM!

By Prema Chaudhari, APIASF Staff

image

APIASF staff members, Prema Chaudhari, Sarah Ha, and Katie Tran-Lam had the pleasure of hanging out with the Honorable Ruby Moy last week! Wondering how Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM) began? Well, Ruby was one of the founders. Amidst her many accomplishments, including being appointed by the President in 1997 as Director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Ruby is a prime example of how to create change for our communities. What emerged from her dedication, alongside many others at the time, was the recognition of the social and economic contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to the U.S. Here’s the Presidential Proclamation by President Barack Obama this year.

As APAHM is wrapped up this year, I personally wanted to give sincere thanks to all those who led and contributed before me!


L to R: Sarah Ha, the Honorable Ruby Moy, Prema Chaudhari, Katie Tran-Lam

"re/present: Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM)" is a 31-day writing challenge designed to get you thinking about APAHM, identity and leadership.  Below is a list of the 31 prompts that we have established for May 2012.
Feel free to start planning out your posts so they can be published “on time”! You are encouraged to submit your posts to us here, or, feel free to also post them on your own blog, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, etc. — just be sure you tag your posts with #repAPAHM!
May 1/ Welcome.How are you celebrating APAHM this year? What activities are planned in your area? If possible, include photos, flyers and/or links in your response.
May 2/ Fill in the Blank.I am from ____. How would you complete the sentence and why? To what degree does your nationality, ethnic or racial background impact your daily experience?
May 3/ Draw Something.Draw and post a self-portrait (doodles are fine!). What setting are you in and why do you have that expression on your face?
May 4/ Really!?Write about one thing others would be surprised to know about you.
May 5/ Stream of Consciousness.Free write for 15 minutes about a club you are involved in or a volunteering opportunity you loved.
May 6/ Gut Reaction.In one sentence, photo, or video, describe what immediately comes to mind when you hear the term “AAPI” (Asian American and Pacific Islander)?
May 7/ The Story of Us.May 7, 1843 marks the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants in America. Think about your family legacy in the United States. What challenges and accomplishments have you (or they) experienced?
May 8/ Snapshot.Post a photo of you, your family and/or community - explain the photo’s significance. How do your experiences and/or the experiences of your family fit into the greater Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) experience?
May 9/ Polyglot…or Not?Can you speak more than one language? What languages do you speak? How do you feel this skill has helped or hindered you?
May 10/ Mission Accomplished.Two-thirds of the 4,000 workers who built the U.S. Transcontinental Railroad were Chinese immigrants, according to these remarks by Honorable John T. Doolittle. Despite the hazardous working conditions and low pay, workers completed the massive, pivotal project on May 10, 1869 in Promontory, Utah. — While the building of the Transcontinental Railroad was a historic undertaking, events in one’s own life can also be significant and transformative. Write about a moment in your life where you, your community and/or family came together to accomplish something meaningful.
May 11/ How Many of Us?Do you know of the recent demographic shifts in the U.S.? Check out the summary report of the 2010 U.S. Census data regarding the The Asian Population: 2010, which highlights its major findings about the Asian American population in 2010, a group that grew faster than any other racial group in the last decade. (If you’re interested in the dialogue around how this affects AANHPIs in higher education, be sure to read the 2011 CARE Report: The Relevance of Asian Americans & Pacific Islanders in the College Completion Agenda.) What does this demographic shift mean to you?
May 12/ Influence.Are there any familial and/or cultural values that inform how you live your life? If so, what are they and how?
May 13/ Just Like Us.During the NFL lockout, Troy Polamalu, a strong safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers, graduated from the University of Southern California with a bachelor’s degree in history on May 13, 2011. In a blog post about his accomplishment, he said, “So I decided to finish what I started and walked that stage today not only because it was very important to me personally, but because I want to emphasize the importance of education, and that nothing should supersede it.” — What is your view on the importance of education? How has the importance of education played a role in your own life?
May 14/ Difference.Which AANHPI figure (historical, living, famous, or otherwise) made a difference in your life? How have they affected your life?
May 15/ Good Reading.What is your favorite book by an AANHPI author? Why?
May 16/ Media Coverage.Tell us about your favorite AANHPI actor/actress, correspondent, etc. and what they did to earn your respect.
May 17/ True Life.This is the trailer for Hana Surf Girls, a documentary that follows the lives of two girls (including GMS Scholar, Lipoa Kahaleuahi!) from Hana, Hawaii as they explore their identities and make sense of where they belong in the world. — Have you seen this or any other AANHPI documentaries? Which one resonated with you the most and why?
May 18/ Visualize.Flip through a magazine and carefully examine how they portray AANHPIs. What message does this send? Is it positive? Negative? Or, are AANHPIs not represented in the magazine? What message does this absence send?
May 19/ Words to Live by.What is one of your favorite quotations from an AANHPI? What does it mean to you?
May 20/ What’s Your Story?Asia Society produced this video to capture the testimonies of various notable Asian Americans (i.e. Sandra Oh, Kal Penn, George Takei and others) who identify as Asian American and what it means to them to claim that identity. We know that their stories are not representative of all of your lived experiences and testimonies of other AANHPI communities are missing. So, what’s your story?
May 21/ In Your Words.Flex those creative writing skills! Compose a poem about an important moment in AANHPI history.
May 22/ Go for the Gold, Part I.Happy 30th birthday, Apolo Anton Ohno! From the gold medal Duke Kahanamoku earned the U.S. in the 1912 Olympics for the 100 m freestyle, to the 8 medals that Ohno has won in men’s short track speed skating, AANHPIs have a rich history in the sports (& Olympic) world. In recent months, Jeremy Lin’s success with the New York Knicks lit up the blogosphere as everyone chimed in with their opinions on biases, stereotypes and ability. — What are your thoughts on AANHPI athletes and any obstacles they may or may not face?
May 23/ Go for the Gold, Part II.On July 2, 1946, Congress passed which bill to remove restrictions on Asian Indian and Filipino immigration and gave India and the Philippines an annual immigration quota of one hundred, respectively? The first 5 people to respond with the correct answer in the blog comments will win a prize! [The answer is here.]
May 24/ Missing in History.AANHPIs have been “MIH” – “Missing in History” – as taught in classrooms, as reflected in the media and the arts and as understood by government policy-makers and program planners. In much of the data used by the federal government, AANHPIs are invisible, relegated to a residual category of “Other.” AANHPIs are challenged to reclaim and re-insert their history, their stories, their faces, their voices and their lives into American History and America’s future (January 2001 AAPI Interim Report to the President & the Nation). — As a follow-up to yesterday’s trivia, share an AANHPI fact or photo that was missing in the history you learned in the classroom.
May 25/ Visibly Invisible.The term “model minority” first appeared in New York Times Magazine on January 6, 1960 in an article titled, “Success Story: Japanese American Style”. In this article, sociologist William Petersen compares Japanese Americans to African Americans, crediting Japanese culture, with its family values and strong work ethic, for saving Japanese Americans from becoming a “problem minority.” “Model minority” created much controversy by pitting one race against another and produced overgeneralizations that come with negative implications for both the African American and AANHPI communities. — What do you think these implications may be? Has this personally affected you and if so, how?
May 26/ Excluded.The Immigration Act of 1924 (Asian Exclusion Act) was enacted on May 26, 1924, limiting the number of immigrants gaining entry into the U.S. Specifically excluding immigrants from Asia, except for Japanese and Filipinos, this Act is one example of legislation restricting access based on race or nationality. This instance of exclusion was driven by federal law, but other forms of exclusion occur to this day. For example, the vast diversity within the AANHPI population is often overlooked when research does not provide specific data on different groups within the population. — Have there been moments in your own life where you felt excluded solely because you are AANHPI? What did you do to address those situations?
May 27/ Inspiration.APIASF recognizes numerous inspirations contributing to the success and well-being of our AANHPI communities. One individual engaged with us is Penny Semaia, Assistant Athletic Director for Student Life at the University of Pittsburgh. When asked why he does what he does, he responds, “My mission in life is to utilize my God given talents and skills to serve those that need it most and provide opportunities for young men and women to succeed.” — Nominate someone you know for a hypothetical #repAPAHM Leadership Award. Explain why you are nominating them.
May 28/ Making Your Mark.How would you like to be remembered in history? What would you like people to remember you by?
May 29/ Building Solidarity.How does the AANHPI experience relate to the experiences of other communities in the U.S.?
May 30/ Synthesize & Summarize.If you had to summarize APAHM in 3 words, what would they be and why?
May 31/ I Am.After participating in our APAHM writing challenge, have you learned more about yourself or your family/community? Has your perspective changed at all? Who are you? What does being AANHPI — especially, an AANHPI leader — mean to you?

"re/present: Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM)" is a 31-day writing challenge designed to get you thinking about APAHM, identity and leadership.  Below is a list of the 31 prompts that we have established for May 2012.

Feel free to start planning out your posts so they can be published “on time”! You are encouraged to submit your posts to us here, or, feel free to also post them on your own blog, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, etc. — just be sure you tag your posts with #repAPAHM!

  • May 1/ Welcome.
    How are you celebrating APAHM this year? What activities are planned in your area? If possible, include photos, flyers and/or links in your response.
  • May 2/ Fill in the Blank.
    I am from ____. How would you complete the sentence and why? To what degree does your nationality, ethnic or racial background impact your daily experience?
  • May 3/ Draw Something.
    Draw and post a self-portrait (doodles are fine!). What setting are you in and why do you have that expression on your face?
  • May 4/ Really!?
    Write about one thing others would be surprised to know about you.
  • May 5/ Stream of Consciousness.
    Free write for 15 minutes about a club you are involved in or a volunteering opportunity you loved.
  • May 6/ Gut Reaction.
    In one sentence, photo, or video, describe what immediately comes to mind when you hear the term “AAPI” (Asian American and Pacific Islander)?
  • May 7/ The Story of Us.
    May 7, 1843 marks the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants in America. Think about your family legacy in the United States. What challenges and accomplishments have you (or they) experienced?
  • May 8/ Snapshot.
    Post a photo of you, your family and/or community - explain the photo’s significance. How do your experiences and/or the experiences of your family fit into the greater Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) experience?
  • May 9/ Polyglot…or Not?
    Can you speak more than one language? What languages do you speak? How do you feel this skill has helped or hindered you?
  • May 10/ Mission Accomplished.
    Two-thirds of the 4,000 workers who built the U.S. Transcontinental Railroad were Chinese immigrants, according to these remarks by Honorable John T. Doolittle. Despite the hazardous working conditions and low pay, workers completed the massive, pivotal project on May 10, 1869 in Promontory, Utah. — While the building of the Transcontinental Railroad was a historic undertaking, events in one’s own life can also be significant and transformative. Write about a moment in your life where you, your community and/or family came together to accomplish something meaningful.
  • May 12/ Influence.
    Are there any familial and/or cultural values that inform how you live your life? If so, what are they and how?
  • May 13/ Just Like Us.
    During the NFL lockout, Troy Polamalu, a strong safety for the Pittsburgh Steelers, graduated from the University of Southern California with a bachelor’s degree in history on May 13, 2011. In a blog post about his accomplishment, he said, “So I decided to finish what I started and walked that stage today not only because it was very important to me personally, but because I want to emphasize the importance of education, and that nothing should supersede it.” — What is your view on the importance of education? How has the importance of education played a role in your own life?
  • May 14/ Difference.
    Which AANHPI figure (historical, living, famous, or otherwise) made a difference in your life? How have they affected your life?
  • May 15/ Good Reading.
    What is your favorite book by an AANHPI author? Why?
  • May 16/ Media Coverage.
    Tell us about your favorite AANHPI actor/actress, correspondent, etc. and what they did to earn your respect.
  • May 17/ True Life.This is the trailer for Hana Surf Girls, a documentary that follows the lives of two girls (including GMS Scholar, Lipoa Kahaleuahi!) from Hana, Hawaii as they explore their identities and make sense of where they belong in the world. — Have you seen this or any other AANHPI documentaries? Which one resonated with you the most and why?
  • May 18/ Visualize.
    Flip through a magazine and carefully examine how they portray AANHPIs. What message does this send? Is it positive? Negative? Or, are AANHPIs not represented in the magazine? What message does this absence send?
  • May 19/ Words to Live by.
    What is one of your favorite quotations from an AANHPI? What does it mean to you?
  • May 20/ What’s Your Story?Asia Society produced this video to capture the testimonies of various notable Asian Americans (i.e. Sandra Oh, Kal Penn, George Takei and others) who identify as Asian American and what it means to them to claim that identity. We know that their stories are not representative of all of your lived experiences and testimonies of other AANHPI communities are missing. So, what’s your story?
  • May 21/ In Your Words.
    Flex those creative writing skills! Compose a poem about an important moment in AANHPI history.
  • May 22/ Go for the Gold, Part I.
    Happy 30th birthday, Apolo Anton Ohno! From the gold medal Duke Kahanamoku earned the U.S. in the 1912 Olympics for the 100 m freestyle, to the 8 medals that Ohno has won in men’s short track speed skating, AANHPIs have a rich history in the sports (& Olympic) world. In recent months, Jeremy Lin’s success with the New York Knicks lit up the blogosphere as everyone chimed in with their opinions on biases, stereotypes and ability. — What are your thoughts on AANHPI athletes and any obstacles they may or may not face?
  • May 23/ Go for the Gold, Part II.
    On July 2, 1946, Congress passed which bill to remove restrictions on Asian Indian and Filipino immigration and gave India and the Philippines an annual immigration quota of one hundred, respectively? The first 5 people to respond with the correct answer in the blog comments will win a prize! [The answer is here.]
  • May 24/ Missing in History.
    AANHPIs have been “MIH” – “Missing in History” – as taught in classrooms, as reflected in the media and the arts and as understood by government policy-makers and program planners. In much of the data used by the federal government, AANHPIs are invisible, relegated to a residual category of “Other.” AANHPIs are challenged to reclaim and re-insert their history, their stories, their faces, their voices and their lives into American History and America’s future (January 2001 AAPI Interim Report to the President & the Nation). — As a follow-up to yesterday’s trivia, share an AANHPI fact or photo that was missing in the history you learned in the classroom.
  • May 25/ Visibly Invisible.
    The term “model minority” first appeared in New York Times Magazine on January 6, 1960 in an article titled, “Success Story: Japanese American Style”. In this article, sociologist William Petersen compares Japanese Americans to African Americans, crediting Japanese culture, with its family values and strong work ethic, for saving Japanese Americans from becoming a “problem minority.” “Model minority” created much controversy by pitting one race against another and produced overgeneralizations that come with negative implications for both the African American and AANHPI communities. — What do you think these implications may be? Has this personally affected you and if so, how?
  • May 26/ Excluded.
    The Immigration Act of 1924 (Asian Exclusion Act) was enacted on May 26, 1924, limiting the number of immigrants gaining entry into the U.S. Specifically excluding immigrants from Asia, except for Japanese and Filipinos, this Act is one example of legislation restricting access based on race or nationality. This instance of exclusion was driven by federal law, but other forms of exclusion occur to this day. For example, the vast diversity within the AANHPI population is often overlooked when research does not provide specific data on different groups within the population. — Have there been moments in your own life where you felt excluded solely because you are AANHPI? What did you do to address those situations?
  • May 27/ Inspiration.
    APIASF recognizes numerous inspirations contributing to the success and well-being of our AANHPI communities. One individual engaged with us is Penny Semaia, Assistant Athletic Director for Student Life at the University of Pittsburgh. When asked why he does what he does, he responds, “My mission in life is to utilize my God given talents and skills to serve those that need it most and provide opportunities for young men and women to succeed.” — Nominate someone you know for a hypothetical #repAPAHM Leadership Award. Explain why you are nominating them.
  • May 28/ Making Your Mark.
    How would you like to be remembered in history? What would you like people to remember you by?
  • May 29/ Building Solidarity.
    How does the AANHPI experience relate to the experiences of other communities in the U.S.?
  • May 30/ Synthesize & Summarize.
    If you had to summarize APAHM in 3 words, what would they be and why?
  • May 31/ I Am.
    After participating in our APAHM writing challenge, have you learned more about yourself or your family/community? Has your perspective changed at all? Who are you? What does being AANHPI — especially, an AANHPI leader — mean to you?